Step 2: Make sure your message is right

We find that trainees often skip this very important step. As a result, their application materials often miss the mark.

 

1. What are your strengths as a future faculty, independent of a given position?

  • For research-focused positions, you may want to ask yourself the following questions:
    • How can I demonstrate leadership in the field?
      • Clear vision for your research
      • Extensive expertise in your area
      • Ability to conduct research independently
      • Recognition by peers
      • Ability to recognize potential areas for collaboration
      • Ability to mentor and manage others
    • How can I demonstrate fundability of your proposed research?
      • Previous success at getting funding,
      • Past contribution to funded grant proposals in your lab,
      • Innovative ideas,
      • Relevance of your research for particular NIH funding programs
    • How can I demonstrate productivity?
      • Publication rate
      • Impact factor
  • For teaching-focused positions, you should ask yourself the following questions:
    • How can I demonstrate my breadth of expertise in teaching?
    • How can I demonstrate my depth of expertise in science?
    • How can I demonstrate my experience with mentoring students?
    • How can I demonstrate that I can serve the educational needs of a teaching-focused institution like this one?

 

2. What are your strengths as a candidate for this particular position?

  • How can you demonstrate that you fit the needs of the department in terms of research and/or teaching focus?
    • Tailor your materials to the posting, and possibly to what you found out about the position through your research/discussions with colleagues at that institution.
  • How can you demonstrate that you fit in as a colleague?
    • This may transpire through the way you portray yourself and through your tone in your CL.

 

Visit our resources for developing academic applications!

 

 

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