Science Education Journal Club

Did you know that science education is undergoing major changes?

 

What you will get out of the meetings:

  • Build a community of UCSF trainees interested in science education
  • Develop a better understanding of successful education practices
  • Discuss recent scientific evidence supporting specific pedagogical approaches with peers

 

Upcoming Journal Club meetings at Mission Bay:

  • Thursday, September 28, 2017 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in MH 1108
  • Thursday, October 26, 2017 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in MH 1109
  • Friday, November 17, 2017 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in MH 1108
  • Wednesday, December 13, 2017 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in MH 1109

 

How to Join:

  • Join us in person at Mission Bay
  • Can't make it to Mission Bay? Participate via Google Hangout! Email us for information ([email protected]).
  • Sign-up to receive future announcements about the SEJC: http://bit.ly/SEJC2 

 

Be a facilitator:

Science Education Journal Club (SEJC) facilitators have the opportunity to choose the article and lead the group discussion.  If you are interested, please email Allyson Spence at [email protected]. The role of the facilitator is to:

  • Choose a paper for discussion and send it to [email protected] at least 2 weeks prior to the journal club date.
  • Send a short summary of the article as well as 2-3 discussion questions at least 1 week prior to the journal club date.
  • Facilitate the article discussion in any format you would like.  For example: pair-share discussions, whips, note card writing, etc.  You could also invite the lead or first author to videoconference into the journal club.

Fall 2017 Articles:

September 2017:

Thursday, September 28, 2017 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in MH 1108

Facilitator:

Article: Robert, J. and Carlsen, W. S. (2017), Teaching and research at a large university: Case studies of science professors. J Res Sci Teach, 54: 937–960. doi:10.1002/tea.21392

A potential shortage of STEM professionals from the future American workforce is now recognized and there is new interest in attracting and retaining STEM students in postsecondary education. These developments point to a need for more research on interventions that might improve STEM faculty teaching practices at the college level, but developing interventions and understanding their effects is predicated on better understanding professors’ values, beliefs, and priorities, as well as their origins. This article utilized four phenomenological case studies conducted to address the following research question: How do individuals in a sample of tenure-track science professors prioritize teaching among their other professional roles and responsibilities? Contrary to literature speculation, the results of this study indicate that the participants make decisions about the way they allocate limited time in an unlimited work environment based on their intrinsic, personal career goals and aspirations and appear to be only minimally affected by external pressures to “prioritize research over teaching.”

Discussion questions:

 

 


Spring 2017 Articles:

May 2017:

Facilitator:  Debbie Thurtle-Schmidt

Article:  Bissonnette SA, Combs ED, Nagami PH, Byers V, Fernandez J, Le D, Realin J, Woodham S, Smith JI, Tanner KD. (2017) Using the Biology Card Sorting Task to Measure Changes in Conceptual Expertise during Postsecondary Biology Education.​ CBE Life Sci Educ. 2017 Spring;16(1). pii: ar14. doi: 10.1187/cbe.16-09-0273.

April 2017

Facilitator:  Katherine Nielsen

Article:  Mendoza-Denton R, Patt C, Fisher A, Eppig A, Young I, Smith A, et al. (2017) Differences in STEM doctoral publication by ethnicity, gender and academic field at a large public research university. PLoS ONE 12(4): e0174296.

When applying for faculty positions, one's publication record is a key factor in hiring decisions. A recent study at a large research institution probed Ph.D. candidates' publication rates by gender, ethnicity, and department. Underrepresented minority groups (URM) were about half as likely to submit research for publication as their non-URM male counterparts. The study also found a smaller gap for women as well as some striking differences across graduate programs.

March 2017:

Guest Speaker: Jeff Schinske, Biology Instructor, De Anza College; Organizer: Allyson Spence

Article: Schinske JN, Perkins H, Snyder A, Wyer M. Scientist Spotlight Homework Assignments Shift Students' Stereotypes of Scientists and Enhance Science Identity in a Diverse Introductory Science Class. CBE Life Sci Educ. 2016 fall;15(3). pii: ar47.

For many students, their first experience with a “real” scientist is in their college STEM courses, which in the US may likely be a professor who is male and white (NSF, 2013). In this study the investigators examined the impact that presenting students with counterstereotypical examples of scientists would have on their perceptions of the types of people that do science as well as their ability to relate to scientists. 

February 2017:

Facilitator: Emily B. Anderson

Article: Increased Preclass Preparation Underlies Student Outcome Improvement in the Flipped Classroom Gross, Pietri, Anderson, Moyano-Camihort, Graham, CBE-LSE Vol. 14, 1–8, Winter 2015.

In this study, the authors converted an upper-level chemistry course from a standard lecture format to a "flipped classroom" where classtime is devoted to problem solving. Following the conversion, student exam scores increased. The authors attribute at least part of the improvement to increased student engagement in online problem solving homework.

 

January 2017:

Facilitator: Robert Newberry

Article: The Scientific Status of Learning Styles Theories. Daniel T. Willingham, Elizabeth M. Hughes, and David G. Dobolyi. Teaching of Psychology 2015, Vol. 42(3) 266-271.

In order to promote success among students with a variety of abilities, many educators attempt to tailor their instruction toward a student’s “learning style,” defined as the student's preference for processing information in a particular way. Though learning styles are broadly accepted and commonly invoked, there is little evidence that addressing student learning styles actually improves learning, raising questions about best practices in the classroom.


Fall 2016 Articles:

December 2016:

Facilitator: Christina Fitzsimmons

Article: Improving and Assessing Student Hands-On Laboratory Skills through Digital Badging. Sarah Hensiek, Brittland K. DeKorver, Cynthia J. Harwood, Jason Fish, Kevin O’Shea, and Marcy Towns. Journal of Chemical Education 2016 93 (11), 1847-1854

Digital badges are online tokens that can be awarded by instructors to assess the completion of a project or the mastery of a skill. This study asks wether the use of digital badges is associated with better student hands-on performance.

November 2016:

Guest Speaker: Lisa McDonnell, Assistant Teaching Professor, UC San Diego; Organizer: Katherine Farrar

Article: Concepts first, jargon second improves student articulation of understanding. McDonnell, L., Barker, M. K. and Wieman, C. (2016) Biochem. Mol. Biol. Educ., 44: 12–19. doi:10.1002/bmb.20922

 

Do students learn scientific concepts better when these concepts are first presented without the scientific jargon? This January 2016 paper by Nobel-laureate Carl Wieman and his team investigates this question in a large undergraduate biology course.

October 2016:

Facilitator: Katherine Farrar

Article: Promoting Student Metacognition. Kimberly D. Tanner. CBE—Life Sciences Education Vol. 11, 113–120, Summer 2012

Studies show that many undergraduate students lack the metacognitive skills to be successful in college. Metacognition, in the context of education, is the process by which learners think about their own thought and learning process, how they plan their studying process, monitor their learning (test themselves) and correct their learning strategy and understanding if needed. This article includes a wide variety of metacognitive strategies that are broadly applicable and easy to integrate into different courses. It also addresses metacognitive approaches for teachers.

Related resources:

Vanderbilt Center for Teaching, Guide on Metacognition, Nancy Chick, Assistant Director: https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/metacognition/

Bransford, J., Brown, A. L., and Cocking, R. (2000). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Crowe, Alison, et al. Biology in Bloom: Implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to Enhance Student Learning in Biology. CBE - Life Sciences Education Vol. 7, 368-381, Winter 2008.

Mynlieff, Michelle, et al. Writing Assignments with a Metacognitive Component Enhance Learning in a Large Introductory Biology Course. CBE - Life Sciences Education Vol. 13, 311-321, Summer 2014.

Pintrich, Paul R. (2002). The Role of Metacognitive Knowledge in Learning, Teaching, and Assessing. Theory Into Practice, 41: 4, 219-225.

September 2016:

Facilitator: Christina Fitzsimmons

Article:  Full STEAM Ahead: The Benefits of Integrating the Arts Into STEM. Michelle H. Land. Procedia Computer Science, Volume 20, 2013, Pages 547-552, ISSN 1877-0509, .


Spring 2016 Articles:

May 2016 :
Article: Connecting biology and organic chemistry introductory laboratory courses through a collaborative research project. Boltax AL, Armanious S, Kosinski-Collins MS, Pontrello JK. Biochem Mol Biol Educ. 2015 Jul-Aug;43(4):233-44. doi: 10.1002/bmb.20871. Epub 2015 Jul 3.

April 2016:
Facilitator: Charlie Morgan, PhD, UCSF alumnus and National Academies Fellow in Science Education, joining us via Skype from Washington DC.
Article:Transforming Science Education at Large Research Universities: A Case Study in Progress (2010) Wieman, Carl; Perkins, Katherine; Gilbert, Sarah. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, v42 n2 p7-14 Mar-Apr 2010

March 2016:

Special Guest Speaker: Erin Dolan, PhD
Article: Modeling Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences: An Agenda for Future Research and Evaluation. Lisa A. Corwin, Mark J. Graham, and Erin L. Dolan
CBE Life Sci Educ vol. 14 no. 1 es1

January 2016:
Caution, Student Experience May Vary: Social Identities Impact a Student’s Experience in Peer Discussions
Sarah L. Eddy, Sara E. Brownell, Phonraphee Thummaphan, Ming-Chih Lan, and Mary Pat Wenderoth
Facilitator: Deborah Thurtle-Schmidt

This study found that self-reported preferred roles in peer discussions in introductory biology classrooms can be predicted by social identities and that barriers to participation in peer discussions may impact certain student groups more than others.


Fall 2015 Articles:

December 2015:

How important is it to encourage interest in science early in children's lives? How early in their lives do students decide to pursue a science-related career? This month's SEJC will examine a paper which used longitudinal data to investigate 8th grade expectations and science related careers.

November 2015: 
Case Study Teaching Method Improves Student Performance and Perceptions of Learning Gains. Kevin M. Bonney.
Case studies have been used in medical education for decades, but basic science instructors are just beginning to use them. Can case studies help a diverse population of introductory biology majors learn biological concepts more than more traditional models of teaching? This article focuses on the effectiveness of published case studies versus case studies developed by the instructor on student performance on exams, as well as on perceived learning gains relating to oral and written communication skills and connection to real-life situations. 

October 2015
Problems in the pipeline: Stereotype threat and women's achievement in high-level math courses

September 2015:
Just the Facts? Introductory Undergraduate Biology Courses Focus on Low-Level Cognitive Skills. CBE—Life Sciences Education Vol. 9, 435–440, Winter 2010 Article
Jennifer L. Momsen,*† Tammy M. Long,‡ Sara A. Wyse,*§ and Diane Ebert-May*
 

 


Spring 2015 Articles:

May 2015:
Implicit Theories of Intelligence Predict Achievement Across and Adolescent Transition: A Longitudinal Study and an Intervention. Blackwell, L.S., Trzesniewski, K.H., & Dweck, C.S. (2007). Child Development, 78, 1, 246-263.

April 2015:
Effect of Teaching Metacognitive Learning Strategies on Performance in General Chemistry Courses. Cook, E., Kennedy, E., & Mcguire, S. Y. (2013). Journal of Chemical Education, 90, 961– 967.

March 2015:
A threat in the air. How stereotypes shape intellectual identity and performance. Steele, CM. Am Psychol., 1997 Jun;52(6):613-29.
Related article: Thin Ice: Stereotype Threat and Black College Students. Steele, CM.

February 2015:
Using online lectures to make time for active learning. Prunuske, A. J., Batzli, J., Howell, E., & Miller, S. (2012). Genetics, 192(1), 67–72.

January 2015: 
Structure Matters: Twenty-one Teaching Strategies to Promote Student Engagement and Cultivate Classroom Equity by Kimberly D. Tanner. CBE Life Sci Educ vol. 12 no. 3 322-331

 

 

 

 


Contact:

  • This series is part of the Academic Career Development program and is offered by the UCSF Office of Career and Professional Development: http://career.ucsf.edu/
  • Contact: Laurence Clement, Program Director of Academic Career Development, UCSF Office of Career and Professional Development, [email protected]
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