Negotiating for a Faculty Position

This page offers tips and resources for negotiating an academic position that will meet your needs and launch your research program effectively. We recommend that you familiarize yourself with the basics of negotiating even before you receive an offer-- by reading our quick links, checking out a book from our resource collection, attending one of our workshops, or watching a video.

Link to our program, slides and sample budget and offer: 

Negotiating your Faculty Job Offer

Getting Started:

  • Download OCPD's Negotiating Your Faculty Startup Package.
    This detailed handout outlines considerations for salary and compensation, start-up funds and space, and provides a useful framework for the negotiation process.
  • Download a handout on Academic Careers Negotiations from the University of Washington’s Career Center.
    This handout offers a detailed list of items you might negotiate for, plus some sage advice about how to handle the negotiation process.

Recommended Reading:

  • Academic Scientists At Work: Negotiating an Academic Position: This brief article from ScienceCareers.org, by Emory professors Jeremy Boss and Susan Eckert, helps you think through 5 key questions in preparation for negotiating (lab size, startup money, time devoted to teaching and service, and how good a fit is the department).
  • Be Honorable and Strategic: This brief article on ScienceCareers.org, by Carnegie Foundation Scholar Chris Golde, outlines how to gather the information that will help you negotiate your academic position effectively.

Delving deeper:

Talk to people you trust

  • Just as you've done at prior stages of the academic job search process, it is critical to use your network during the negotiation stage. Make sure to consult new faculty who have recently gone through this process, and ask them how they navigated the negotiations, what strategies they found to be effective, and what they wish they had done differently.
  • If you are asked to provide a budget for your start-up needs, you will also want to ask members of your network for examples of what this looks like. For an anonymized sample budget, visit our Academic Samples page.